Courses


2021/S - ENST 601: Environmental Humanities Research Forum - Diluvial Houston [w/ Dominic Boyer]
The Environmental Humanities Research Forum meets regularly to share research, teaching, and other activities in the environmental humanities with both members of the Rice community and invited guests. Activities may include: attending lectures and special seminars by visiting scholars; attending and participating in Center for Environmental Studies symposia; working on special projects for the Center for Environmental Studies including participating in arts and other projects especially at the Solar Studios; webinar and lecture series; the center's public-facing website; and more. Evaluation is based on student participation, research and presentations. During Spring 2021, the Research Forum will be conducted by Professors Dominic Boyer and Farès el-Dahdah. The Forum will focus on Houston, a city that faces aqueous environmental threats like no other US city of similar size and scale. The environmental threats that Houston faces have only dramatically increased with the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and what is equally clear is that the city is particularly prone to disenfranchising segments of its population in times of crises.

2019/2020 - HURC 503: Spatial Studies Graduate Mellon Seminar [w/Joe Carson]
The seminar will introduce students to Spatial Studies as an emerging field of knowledge production, as well as to prominent scholars working in the field. The seminar will be structured around the visits of scholars who will give public lectures during regularly scheduled class time. Also, students will look into ongoing research that not only stems from a surge of scholarly interest in space but that also exploits a vast assortment of information technologies; explore, critique, and experience the modeling and mapping of historic sites and events; and together incubate a multidisciplinary and broadly humanistic collaboration among interested tech innovators, faculty, and students.

2018/S - HURC 450/650: Spatial Humanities Master Class [w/ Laura Richardson and Kyle G. Sweeney]
The Spatial Humanities Master Class will introduce students to the newly-forming spatial humanities canon, as well as to prominent scholars working in the field. The course will be structured around the visits of nine such scholars, who will give public lectures during regularly scheduled class time. In addition to the public lectures on Thursdays, class meetings on Tuesdays will be used to look into ongoing research that not only stems from a surge of scholarly interest in space but that also exploits a vast assortment of information technologies; explore, critique, and experience the modeling and mapping of historic sites and events; and together incubate a multidisciplinary and broadly humanistic collaboration among interested tech innovators, faculty, and students.

2016-17 - HURC 303: Rice Seminar: Chronotopic Imaginaries: The City in Signs, Signals, and Scripts [w/ Melissa Bailar]
The ubiquity of today’s connectedness, in addition to the ongoing production, collection, and curation of massive amounts of data, has produced a new textual medium. Made of tweets, posts, messages, chats, etc. (all associated with time, date, and longitude and latitude), this new medium now flows through a pervasive network of computers, tablets, smartphones, PDAs, media players, and GPS navigation units. This “text” needs a new reader, one as critical and perceptive as previous semioticians who interpreted the signs and signals of often equally disruptive literary scripts.

2015-16 - HURC 403: John E. Sawyer Seminar on the Comparative Study of Cultures: Platforms of Knowledge in a Wide Web of Worlds: Production, Participation, and Politics [w/ Melissa Bailar and Lisa Spiro]
Coinciding with the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web’s public debut, the Humanities Research Center at Rice University is hosting a 2015-16 John E. Sawyer Seminar on the Comparative Study of Cultures funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The seminar will incubate a broadly humanistic collaboration among tech innovators, visiting scholars, faculty and students. The goal is to explore, critique, and experience digital knowledge platforms (i.e., e-learning, publishing, collaborative research, or crowd-sourced) that uphold our academic mission to disseminate knowledge by enabling teachers, students and researchers to discover, analyze, share information without regard to barriers of space and time, and publish work widely. These same platforms, however, raise questions about what counts as expertise, who controls access to information, what gets lost in translation, what power is likely to shift from educational institutions to profit-seeking companies, how the privileging of quantification and metrics affects humanistic wisdom, and how academic autonomy and diversity are ultimately disrupted.

2014/S - ARCH/HART 345/645: History and Theory II (pre-1890)

2013/F - ARCH/HIST 366/666: Rio de Janeiro: A Social and Architectural History [w/ Alida Metcalf]

2013/S - ARCH/HART 345/645: History and Theory II (pre-1890)

2012/F - ARCH/HIST 366/666: Rio de Janeiro: A Social and Architectural History [w/ Alida Metcalf]

2012/S - ARCH/HART 345/645: History and Theory II (pre-1890)

2011/S - ARCH/HIST 366/666: Rio de Janeiro: A Social and Architectural History [w/ Alida Metcalf]

2011/S - ARCH 504: Core Design Studio IV (A Mundaneum for Brasilia)

2010/F - ARCH 459/659: Modern Brazil: Ideal Cities in the Tropics

2009/F - ARCH 703: Thesis Studio

2008/S - ARCH/HART 346/646: Architecture and the City II (pre-1968)

2008/S - ARCH 686: Interpreting Buildings

2007/F - ARCH 601: Architectural Problems: PPB 50/Oscar 100

2007/S - ARCH/HART 346/646: Architecture and the City II (pre-1968)

2007/S - ARCH 686: Interpreting Buildings

2006/F - ARCH 459/659: Modern Brazil

2006/S - ARCH/HART 346/646: Architecture and the City II (1850 to 1960)

2005/F - ARCH 459/660: Modern Brazil

2005/F - ARCH 703: Thesis Studio

2004/S - ARCH/HART 346/646: Architecture and the City II (1850 to 1960)

2004/S - ARCH 701: Pre-Thesis Preparation

2003/F - ARCH 485/685: Architecture and Society I (Ideal City)

2003/S - ARCH/HART 346/646: Architecture and the City II (1850 to 1960)

2003/S - ARCH/HART 346/686: Architecture and Society II (Modern Architecture)

2003/S - ARCH 701: Pre-Thesis Preparation

2002/F - ARCH/HART 686: Architecture and Society I (Ideal City)

2002/S - ARCH 701: Pre-Thesis Preparation

2001/S - ARCH 431/631: Architecture in Fiction: The Villain's Lair in James Bond

2001/S - ARCH 701: Pre-Thesis Preparation

2000/S - ARCH 431/631: Architecture in Fiction

2000/S - ARCH 701: Pre-Thesis Preparation

1999/F - ARCH/HART 485/685: Architecture and Society I (Canonicity in Architecture)

1999/F - ARCH 703: Thesis Studio

1999/S - ARCH 701: Pre-Thesis Preparation

1998/F - ARCH 431/631: Architecture in Fiction

1998/F - ARCH 703: Thesis Studio

1998/S - ARCH 701: Pre-Thesis Preparation

1997/F - ARCH 431/631: Architecture in Fiction

1997/S - ARCH 302/402: Vertical Studio (Cine-Megaplex)

1996/F - ARCH 429/629: The Work and Text of Architects

1996/F - ARCH 301: Principles of Architecture III (Truck Stop)

1996/S - ARCH : Xtra-Architecture

1996/S - ARCH 602: Option Studio (Houston: Bigger than Big)

1995/F - ARCH 629: Building Affects: Architecture's Amorous Discourse

1995/F - ARCH 301: Principles of Architecture III (Casino)

1994/F - ARCH 627: Minimalizing Architecture

1994/F - ARCH 301: Principles of Architecture III (Museum)

1994/S - ARCH 428/628: Architecture's Amorous Discourse

1994/S - ARCH 302/402: Vertical Studio (Zoo)